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Reblogged from yeshecholwa  10,780 notes

We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave. By A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression. From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’

Reblogged from megacosms  1,482 notes
ohstarstuff:

Eight million light years away lies galaxy NGC 2403. Spanning nearly 50,000 light years in diameter, the galaxy displays its incredible spiral arms with hot young stars in blue and glowing star-formation regions in red. (Credit: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum)

ohstarstuff:

Eight million light years away lies galaxy NGC 2403. Spanning nearly 50,000 light years in diameter, the galaxy displays its incredible spiral arms with hot young stars in blue and glowing star-formation regions in red.

(Credit: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum)

Reblogged from wilwheaton  103,004 notes

In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street. By Neil deGrasse Tyson