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Anger … it’s a paralyzing emotion … you can’t get anything done. People sort of think it’s an interesting, passionate, and igniting feeling — I don’t think it’s any of that — it’s helpless … it’s absence of control — and I need all of my skills, all of the control, all of my powers … and anger doesn’t provide any of that — I have no use for it whatsoever. By Toni Morrison (via feellng)

Reblogged from rainbowtwo  10 notes

The Ending of Constant Journeying

rainbowtwo:

'It is through not understanding, not penetrating four things that we have run so erratically, wandering on so long in this round of existence, both you and I. What are the four? Goodness, concentration, wisdom, and liberation. When these four things are understood and penetrated, craving for superficial existence is rooted out and that which leads to continued return to the same conditions is ended. There is no more constant journeying.'

- Digha Nikaya in The Buddha Speaks, A book of guidance from the Buddhist scriptures, edited by Anne Bancroft.

Reblogged from nprfreshair  175 notes
nprfreshair:

Today we’re playing an excerpt of Terry’s interview with Elaine Stritch, a performer lucky enough to have debuted songs by Noel Coward and Stephen Sondheim, and to have been coached by each of them.  She died last Thursday at the age of 89. 
Stritch used to describe herself as “a Catholic, diabetic, alcoholic, pain in the ass.”  Her Broadway career began in 1946.  She was Ethel Merman’s understudy in the Irving Berlin musical Call Me Madam in the early 50s, and starred in Noel Coward’s 1961 Broadway musical Sail Away, in a role that he expanded to suit her large talent.   In 1970 she co-starred in the Sondheim musical Company, where she sang what became one of her signature songs, The Ladies Who Lunch.  In 2002, she was on Broadway in her autobiographical one woman show Elaine Stritch At Liberty.   In 2010, she replaced Angela Lansbury in Sondheim’s A Little Night Music.  TV audiences knew her from 30 Rock playing Alec Baldwin’s mother. 
Terry spoke with Stritch in 1999, when she was starring in a revival of Sail Away, in honor of Noel Coward’s centennial. 

nprfreshair:

Today we’re playing an excerpt of Terry’s interview with Elaine Stritch, a performer lucky enough to have debuted songs by Noel Coward and Stephen Sondheim, and to have been coached by each of them.  She died last Thursday at the age of 89. 

Stritch used to describe herself as “a Catholic, diabetic, alcoholic, pain in the ass.”  Her Broadway career began in 1946.  She was Ethel Merman’s understudy in the Irving Berlin musical Call Me Madam in the early 50s, and starred in Noel Coward’s 1961 Broadway musical Sail Away, in a role that he expanded to suit her large talent.   In 1970 she co-starred in the Sondheim musical Company, where she sang what became one of her signature songs, The Ladies Who Lunch.  In 2002, she was on Broadway in her autobiographical one woman show Elaine Stritch At Liberty.   In 2010, she replaced Angela Lansbury in Sondheim’s A Little Night Music.  TV audiences knew her from 30 Rock playing Alec Baldwin’s mother. 

Terry spoke with Stritch in 1999, when she was starring in a revival of Sail Away, in honor of Noel Coward’s centennial. 

Reblogged from panatmansam  29 notes

Good, Bad or Indifferent

panatmansam:

All feelings tell us where we stand vis à vis the external environment. Feelings include physical feelings such as pain and pleasure, primitive responsive feelings such as fear and complex feelings which we call emotion. All emotions are feelings but not all feelings are emotions. Feelings aside from emotions are reactions and responses to outside stimuli. Emotions, with the exception of fear, are the result of thought. All feelings are positive, neutral or negative.

Our senses and our thinking tells us “this is happening” our feelings tell us “this thing is good, bad or neutral”. All living creatures, even those without the capacity for thought, have feeling. All can say this is good or this is bad. If something is bad we move away, if something is good we draw to toward it, if something is neutral we ignore it. The same is true for a man, a mouse or even a bacterium.

A machine can think but no machine can ever feel. Feeling and not thinking is the foundation of consciousness.

๑ Samsaran ๑